Which kid are you in this viral track meet?

Over the weekend, tens of millions of people viewed this amazing viral video of a bunch of children running hurdles at a track meet. You may have been one of them.

 

 

The user who posted it left the caption, "focus on a different child every time you watch."

Videos like this go viral for a reason: people identify with them on a deeply personal level. In this one, each kid represents a comically different personality, and every adult can see a little bit of themselves in each one of them.

Here's my best guess for each of them...

Kid A - Black sweatshirt with white stripes

Enneagram Type 3, ENTP, DISC Type D

This kid is so laser-focused on winning that he's halfway to the first hurdle before a few seconds before anyone else even takes a step. Unsatisfied with his hurdle, he smoothly weaves into his opponents lane and blocking the way as he makes his jump. A 3 after my own heart.

Kid B - Green shirt, green socks

Enneagram Type 9, INFP, DISC Type S

Honestly, our Green Shirt is just happy to be here participating with his friends. He doesn't mind when Kid A invades his personal space and purposely ruins his race time. Green Shirt adapts, walks right around the first hurdle, and continues on his way. No drama to see here.

Kid C - Orange shirt, blue shorts, blond hair

Enneagram Type 7, ESFP, DISC Type I

My personal favorite. Orange Shirt is so excited to get this thing started and jump over his first hurdle that he stumbles over his own feet before he makes it. You can see the energy radiating; he falls and gets right back up, throwing caution to the wind. He may not win, but you can bet this kid will be smiling at the finish.

Kid D - Pink shirt, blue shorts, brown hair

Enneagram Type 1, ISTJ, DISC Type C

Pink Shirt seems to be the one of only two kids in this whole race who understand the concept of a hurdle, and he must do it correctly. You can see his patience and thoughtful determination as he takes his time, stops, and makes sure to jump with the proper form over his hurdle, even in the midst of such chaos all around him.

Kid E - Blue shirt, gray shorts (3rd lane from the left)

Enneagram Type 8, ESTP, DISC Type DI

He's fast. He's motivated. He's also completely unafraid to take a shortcut (until mom catches him). While he may be disqualified, you gotta admire this kid's fearlessness.

Kid F - White shirt, pink shorts (2nd lane from the left)

Enneagram Type 5, INTJ, DISC Type Cd

Although he only appears in the frame for a few seconds, Kid F shows us a brand of outside-the-box thinking that we could use more of in our school system. Instead of jumping over the hurdle like his more compliant friends, he finds a different, more efficient, and probably illegal solution to this problem of obstacle-scaling.

Kid G - Blue shirt, red shorts, brown hair (1st lane from the right)

Enneagram Type 6, ISFP, DISC Type Sc

Last but not least, we have Kid G, who looks like an adult in a child's body among his peers. He's not the fastest, but he steadily moves forward. He knows the rules, but he doesn't distract himself with conflict when others don't follow them. He's ready for middle management before the 3rd grade.

Small sample size, I know, but... I'm really curious to know if this race foreshadows these kids' career paths. Stay tuned for Part II of this blog post in 2040.

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